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Posts Tagged ‘Robert E. Kennedy’

Oxherding_pictures,_No._6Mounting the bull, slowly
I return homeward.
The voice of my flute intones
through the evening.
Measuring with hand-beats
the pulsating harmony,
I direct the endless rhythm.
Whoever hears this melody
will join me.

The sixth picture suggests the tranquility and joy that reunion with the source of existence brings; now the oxherd rides on the back of the ox, joyously playing his flute. The verse suggests that he has been freed from old fears and anxieties and that so freed, he can now express his creative energies in celebration of life.[1]

Oneness, what does that mean to you?  The oxherder finds oneness with the Ox as he rides joyfully home harmonizing his flute, his body, and his mind with the ox.  In doing so he does not even need to hold on to the reigns as his fear of falling off the ox has disappeared.  He knows that there is no separation between the two of them and thus happily rides along playing his flute.

When we separate ourselves from people, and things, and ways we limit our abilities, we hinder our creativity, and we make life harder and more uncomfortable.  Being one with everything opens us up to insights and Ah Ha’s that otherwise would have eluded us.  To be one with the dying man as a hospice chaplain is an incredible experience.  To allow yourself to laugh with bottomless joy along with a young child is being awakened to the oneness that permeates the universe.

Laughter is catchy if one person starts laughing others seem to join in even if they do not know what the person is laughing about.  The same thing happens when someone cries, we all cry with them or try desperately to hold back the tears.  And when someone yawns everyone else must yawn no matter how hard they try not to. Just reading this sentence about yawing I know you are having trouble holding back the yawn that is trying desperately to come out!

Roshi Kennedy says that the “unity between the absolute and the relative is fundamental to Zen Buddhism (page 68).”[1]  Although we may not feel it most of the time that does not mean that it is not true.  So, when you feel disconnected to life or to a situation or a person remember that oneness exists even if the eyes can’t see it, the ears can’t hear it, and the mind can’t fathom it—it is still true! Just ask the tooth fairy! I can see that money underneath my pillow right now!

In gassho, Shokai

[1] http://www.columbia.edu/cu/weai/exeas/resources/pdf/oxherding.pdf

[2] Kennedy, R. (2004) Zen Gifts to Christians. NY: Continuum

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Eihei Dogen wrote, “The body and mind of the Buddha way is grass, trees, tiles, and pebbles, as well as wind, rain, water, and fire.  To turn them around and make them the buddha way—this is the aspiration for enlightenment. (page 47)”[1] What an expansive idea this is for most people.  In Pali “Buddha” literally means “awakened one.”  To be awakened means that we see everything as a part of the whole, where no separation exists between the natural world and the human world: All is one.

This principle is taught in the metaphysical Christian churches as well where we learn that there is “no place where God is not.” That the creation or life force is the same in all things and Shakyamuni Buddha or Jesus Christ was an embodied being that recognized this and lived a life that demonstrated it.  The life force energy is within us to be co-creators of a world of peace, love, and compassion for all things.

Although we may not recognize this within ourselves Dogen goes on to write, “It is the buddha way altogether at the beginning, in the middle, and at the end.  It is like journeying a long distance; one step is within one thousand mile, one thousand steps are within one thousand miles.  The first step and the one-thousandth step are different but are equally within the one thousand miles (page47-48).”[2]  There is no need for you to go on a long journey to “find” the Buddha or the Christ within. Whether you have gone within through prayer, meditation, or sitting one time or one thousand times they are equal but different places on the journey.

I asked my mother one day if she thought that “God was everywhere present.”  She said of course.  Then I pointed to the lamp and said, “So God is in the lamp then.”  She said, “Don’t be silly God is not in the lamp.”  And, of course, I replied, “How could that be if you just told me that God was everywhere present, and the lamp is somewhere then God must be in the lamp.”  That blew her mind and she went back to her knitting.

And yet, we all try to separate the idea of oneness by dividing it into categories of animate and inanimate things; between sentient and non-sentient things.  Since we live inside these tiny bodies which have skin and bones and create separation it is hard for us to see the oneness in all things–yet it is there.

Robert E. Kennedy in his wonderful book Zen Spirit, Christian Spirit (page 57) quotes John Wu The Golden Age of Zen (page 2)[3] “When all things return to the One, even gold loses its value.  But when the One returns to all things, even the pebbles sparkle.”  When we pray, meditate, or sit we return to the one and we sparkle as well.

So our task for this week is to really look for the oneness in each other, in those animate and inanimate-sentient and non-sentient things:  To look for the fragrance in the cactus and the thorns in the rose; to find something worthwhile in all creatures, large and small and in all beings friendly and unfriendly.  And then we will be “awakened” to the oneness of all things.

Awaken to the beauty of this day, Shokai

Things to focus on this week:

1.  I will begin each day setting my intention to see the beauty in all things.

2.  I will remind myself that I too can be awakened with one step or one thousand the choice is mine!

3.  I will work each day on sitting at least 10 minutes to recognize my oneness with all things.

4.  Lastly, I will keep a journal of the opportunities that have been presented to me so I can keep track of my progress and my opportunities for growth.


[1] Tanahashi, K. Levitt, P. (2013) The Essential Dogen, Writings of the Great Zen Master. Shambhala: Boston, MA

[2] Ibid.

[3] Kennedy, R.E. (1995) Zen Spirit, Christian Spirit, The Place of Zen in Christian Life. Continuum: NY, NY

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