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Posts Tagged ‘right livelihood’

 

Bhikkhu Nyanasobhano starts this chapter with an interesting thought, “…a fundamental purpose of many of us is the search for love, especially romantic love.  This is often the floor to which people fall after the collapse of other dreams (page 31-32).[1]

All of us have fallen into this trap and why not?  Every ad on TV shows people in love, loving their spouses, children, pets, cars, clothes, and more.  Its hidden message is you’ll “love” our product it will make you happy and fulfill your dreams.  It’s like grasping for the gold ring on the merry-go-round at the boardwalk.  If you don’t catch it—you are mad and sad.  If you do catch it—you quickly realize that it is not made of gold at all but of brass with little or no intrinsic value in it.

He says, “We must know ourselves before we presume to know another and demand quotas of romance, tenderness, and attention. If love is to refresh us and uplift us at all it must be realistically considered and fantastically worshipped.  Through the day-to-day practice of basic virtues, it should be made better, made sound, made right. To do that we should examine all its aspects in ourselves and discard the unhelpful—the admixtures of conceit, greed, self-importance, etc (page 36-37).”[2]

To love and be loved is the greatest gift of all and with his advice you can experience it in its simplest form without clinging, grabbing, or fearing.

Love is never the poorer for being accompanied by wisdom.  …the perfection of love means ultimately, the perfection of one’s own character (page 39).  No good thing prospers long in ignorance.  The better we understand this flawed universe the more skillfully we can live, and the happier we will be. We love best when we do not love out of desperation (page 41).[3]

And to find this wisdom Jay invites us to live our lives by using the Buddhist Eightfold Path shown below from his blog. I hope you’ll check it out at:

https://bluejayblog.wordpress.com/2015/09/13/leaders-on-the-eightfold-path/

8 fold Path bluejayblog

Since there is “nothing higher to live for” just imagine what all of our relationships would look like if we all walked the Eightfold Path!  Love in all its flavors, iterations, names, and relationships would be a pleasure and although we may see a little bump in the road now and then it would only be a bump and not a mountain or a crater!

Try it and let me know how it goes!

[1]Nyanasobhano, B. (1998) Landscapes of wonder Discovering Buddhist Dhamma in the world around us. Somerville Massachusetts: Wisdom Publications

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ibid.

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I was thinking about what to write for my next blog and seeing that New Year’s Eve was soon to be upon me I thought about what I would like to do to make 2014 a memorable year in my life.  We had a very interesting discussion at our Zen book study this morning and several of us shared stories from the past about how we had hurt or been hurt by others in our lives and how we dealt with those hurts in the past and what we could do in the future with those memories, thoughts, or actions.

It reminded me of a book that I am reading now with a most intriguing title: If You’re Lucky, Your Heart Will Break, Field Notes from a Zen Life by James Ishmael Ford. Part III of his book is entitled “Talking the Talk, Walking the Walk.”  It made me think about 2013 and if I just talked the talk, spouted the platitudes and Zen teachings in a rote manner without really living them, and what that may have done to my life, and to those who had the misfortune or fortune to pass through it with me.

In the book he writes, “What we don’t notice about ourselves is the most dangerous part of who we are (page 93).”[1] He goes on, “. . .we see that the good and ill of an individual lives on, but not in a new single body—rather, among those who that person touched in life, in the fruit of their actions as they touched the world, and in the world itself (page 96).”[2]

And so, rather than go about making a list and checking it twice trying to find if I’d been naughty or nice I read on.  And low and behold more words of wisdom jumped out of the page at me when he began to talk about the idea of karma.  “From the perspective of human experience, the universe and each of our circumstances within it just is. Karma is the observation that everything has causes and everything has consequences; rebirth is the observation that I am constantly being created and recreated by each succeeding moment (page 97).”[3]  And thus everything ends up being “just this.”

So it does not matter whether I make the list or not—what does matter is that I practice the art of being mindful of my thoughts and words and the actions that follow. What matters is that in 2014 I live a life that exemplifies the Buddhist moral discipline part of the Eightfold Path: Right Speech, Right Action, and Right Livelihood.

For me that means continuing to be an active part of our Zendo (Southern Palm Zen Group), my prison ministry, my work with Enroll America to help everyone get signed up for healthcare, and being cognoscente of the thoughts that I think, the words that I speak, and the actions that I take.  I can only do that when I focus on being mindful in body, mind, and spirit each and every moment of each and every day.

I know it is a large goal, but it is one that will help me achieve my 2014 life goal: making it memorable. I want it to be something I will be proud of when 2015 rolls around. So if you see me and I am not particularly expressing right speech, right action or right livelihood please let me know and bring me back to my 2014 goal: making the year memorable.  And I mean memorable in a good way, NOT a bad way for you and/or for me.  I’ll need your help with that, that’s for sure! I learned long ago that I cannot do it alone, but I can do it with everyone’s help—especially yours.

I hope you’ll catch me talking the talk AND walking the walk!

In gassho, Shokai

 ingassho


[1] Ford, J. I. (2012) If You’re Lucky, Your Heart Will Break, Field Notes from a Zen Life  Wisdom Publications: Boston, MA

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ibid.

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