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For anything new to emerge there must first be a dream, an imaginative view of what might be. For something great to happen, there must be a great dream.  Then venturesome persons with faith in that dream will persevere to bring it to reality.

Some ideas whose time has come will spread as in a forest fire. But most need the help of a teacher.  I had the good fortune to have an extraordinary one.  He dreamed a great dream of how servanthood could be nurtured in the young, and he spent his best years in bringing it to pass (page 9-10).[1]

Where I work at Kaplan University they encourage not only the students to volunteer and make a difference in their communities but they encourage all faculty to do so as well through The Virtual Difference Makers. Here is a list of some of the things they did in 2016: ran a Spring Virtual Serve-A-Thon, hosted a Stress Management Series, a Virtual Celebration of Rio, sponsored their first annual Health and Wellness Fair, held a Fall Serve-A-Thon and more!.

I have been invited to Lynn University to participate in an interfaith dialog and will be back there again in April for another interfaith dialog.  The hall was jammed with students!  Standing room only!  They asked wonderful questions of the panel.

These were the words on the Flyer for the event: Healing the Divide: Interfaith Dialogue.

In a world where religion so often is the cause of hate and intolerance, we stand infaith-headtogether at Lynn to create a world where our religious differences are not simply tolerated but celebrated. This event is precisely that; where religious leaders from the Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, Hindu, and Atheist traditions will come together in celebration of our diverse faith traditions.  Come and be amazed!

Imagine the great education the students are receiving at both Kaplan and Lynn and many other colleges around our country when their faculty and administration support such events.

If you are able to create similar events on your campuses I encourage you to do so.  Create a Virtual Difference Makers club for students and faculty, run interfaith dialogues, offer training for faculty on meditation and mindfulness.  Be the change you want to see in our world! Be the catalyst for peace, love, and kindness spreading around your campus and beyond!  The time has come to spread the message of servant leadership at all levels.  Change has always come from the bottom up not from the top down! Be the change you want to see in the world!

Good luck with that!  Let me know how it goes!

Shokai

 

[1] Greenleaf, R.K. (1987) Teacher as Servant: A Parable. The Greenleaf Center for Servant-Leadership: Indianapolis, IN

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Religious experts came together for “Healing the Divide: Interfaith Dialogue” on Nov. 16, 2016 at Lynn University. Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, Hindu and atheist beliefs were discussed during an open question and answer forum guided by Dr. Mark Luttio, associate professor of religion at Lynn University.

“In a world increasingly marked by division, it benefits us to promote unity and understanding,” said Luttio. “Lynn is committed to promoting an environment where religious differences are not simply tolerated but celebrated.”

Over 150 guests gathered in the university’s Snyder Sanctuary, a space designed for people of all faiths and belief systems to visit for contemplative thought, spiritual exploration, meditation, music and celebration. Speakers included:

  • Rabbi Barry Silver (Reform Judaism)
  • Rabbi Mark Winer (Reform Judaism)
  • Warren Witter (Evangelical Christian)
  • Shaikh Shafayat Mohammed (Muslim imam)
  • Renwick Bell (Mainline Protestant)
  • Ken Loukinen (President of Florida Atheists)
  • Martin Devereaux (Roman Catholic)
  • Harika Rao (Hinduism)
  • Kathleen Shokai Bishop (Zen Buddhist)

Silver expressed that all religions have unique theories. For example, Judaism has developed over time and revolves around the idea that there are no particular privileges to being Jewish, only specific responsibilities.

Dr. Kathleen Shokai Bishop brought light to Buddhist principles of inclusivity, peace, love and compassion—qualities that all speakers agreed are important in serving others regardless of their beliefs.

“What students experienced here was true dialogue,” added Luttio. “What I wanted them to take from this event was sense of hope in making a change in the world since we have the ability to hold valuable conversations as we leave our differences behind.”

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Emerson: The foundations of a person are not in matter but in spirit (page 29).[1]

The Poetry of tu-fu-poet-712-770Zen:  ~by Tu Fu (712-770) “I Stand Alone”
Heaven’s ways include the human;
Among a thousand sorrows, I stand alone (page51).[2]

 

As Emerson says the person’s true foundation is his or her spirit where “heaven’s ways” include us as our lives move from the thousand sorrows to endless joys and into bliss.  This occurs only if we allow it to. Only if we take time out of every day to know it, live it, and spend time in the quiet experiencing it.

The “matter” in our lives does not count if we are wallowing in our “thousand sorrows” standing alone in our pain and suffering avoiding our spiritual self, our divine self, our perfect self.  Each of us was made in the image of divine perfection as Thich Nhat Hanh says, “Because you are alive everything is possible.” As we watch the blind person walking down the street enjoying the day laughing with a friend we can see the spirit in each of them sharing their divine selves with each other.

Watch the children in the playground laughing and singing and playing lost in the simplest things—being spirit in motion! Watch the musicians in the symphony orchestra play and become one with their instruments. Soon they are playing in perfect harmony, union, and joy. That is the foundation of spirit. Heaven’s ways for sure!

Some of them may have a thousand things not going perfectly in their lives but in those moments they stand alone with the music in their humanity and soar above those sorrows to heaven on earth.

I tripped going into the Lynn University concert hall two weeks ago trying to avoid an elderly woman with a cane who did not see me.  I fell, splashed myself all over the sidewalk, and was helped up by the crossing guard.  I did not wallow in my sorrow because my spirit said go and immerse yourself in the beauty of the student orchestra and be in their joy and passion for their music.  So I did and I enjoyed every moment of it!  I took my friend home and then took myself to the ER where I discovered the foot was broken.

I chose to live in the moment to bask in “heaven’s way” with the music and in the company of my dear friend.  Because the foundation of a person is not in “matter” but in “spirit.” My spirit soared with the music and encompassed my body and mind as I became one with it. What joy there is in life if we simply look for it, are open to receive it, and get out of heaven’s way. Be ready to “stand alone” to receive it!

In gassho,

Shokai

[1] Floris, O. Inspiration & Wisdom from the pen of Ralph Waldo Emerson. www.odeliafloris.com

[2] Hamill, S. and Seaton J.P. (2007) The Poetry of Zen. Shambala:Boston & London

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