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Posts Tagged ‘limitations’

img_zazen_postureThis last chapter will totally debunk the 9 chapters before it!  What a fabulous way to end my story…

Even though there are millions of pieces of writings about Buddhism it is more important for your life to keep it simple!  Since there are the schools of Theravada (Hinayana), Mahayana and Vajrayana. There are Zen/Chan Buddhists, Tibetan Buddhists, and how about Tantrism.

But Dogen simply relies on one thing and one thing only as he says, “From the first time you meet a master, without engaging in incense offering, bowing, chanting Buddha’s name, repentance, or reading scriptures, you should just wholeheartedly sit, and thus drop away body and mind (page 145).”[1]

Yes, we love to start our sitting with services by chanting or reading or singing a sutra to set the stage for sitting (zazen). However, it is not necessary to do so to be a Buddhist, or to reach enlightenment, or to find peace in your life. It does not matter if you were raised as a Catholic, a Protestant, a Jew, an atheist, or in an indigenous group such as Aboriginal or Manitoba with The Seven Grandfather’s Teachings.  You will benefit by simply sitting.

 

Sitting each day will help you meld with your traditions through the silence, to be one with the peace “that passes all understanding.”  Regardless of whether you sit for 5 minutes or 50 minutes make time to sit!  As Dogen says, “In this sense, the words ‘Mind itself is buddha’ are like the moon reflected on water; the teaching ‘Sitting itself is becoming buddha’ is like the reflection in the mirror (page 149).”[2]

Whose reflection do you see in the mirror each day?  The reflection of your buddha nature of peace, love, and compassion or the reflection of the bandit’s MO—lack, limitation, fear, and anger?  The bandit wants to steal your health, peace, compassion, and joy.  Will you let that happen?

Who shows up today is in your hands alone—the buddha or the bandit!

It is always up to you.

[1] Tanahashi, K. (1985) Moon in a Dewdrop Writings of Zen Master Dogen North Point Press: New York

[2] Ibid.

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Thich Nhat HanhAs I continue to read this awesome book, I am awakened to the power of it right now today in my life.  Dogen quotes from the Regulations for Zen Monasteries about the rules and tips on how to serve the assembly.

He writes, “Just think about how best to serve the assembly, and do not worry about limitations.  If you have unlimited mind, you will have limitless happiness.” This is the way the abbot attentively serves the assembly (page 61).”

What a powerful idea: unlimited mind!

Dogen insists that we all have the all-encompassing “unlimited mind.” He encourages us to open up our minds to all the possibilities that are out there for us. All the challenges, joys, ideas and opportunities that are there for us to recognize and then act upon.  Even if the act is to do something rather simple like an email to an ill friend that might cheer them up or sharing a supportive word to a co-worker or bringing a hot meal over to a sick neighbor.

When I live this day with the idea that I have access to my unlimited mind and all the possibilities that come with it…Wow! When my only job is to be open to see those possibilities and then act on them—how hard is that? If I do it my life can abound with mystery and joy. All I have to do is acknowledge the incredibleness of the world and my all-encompassing unlimited mind and keep my eyes open to see it and hear it.

Just the other day I spoke with a man sitting at the table next to me in Starbucks. He was stuffing envelopes and he shared with me that he earns only 10 cents for each one he stuffs and that is how he gets to eat each day.  As I got ready to leave the universe reminded me of an affirmation that I had shared with my Unity students often: The right and perfect job with the right and perfect pay comes to me today!  So I wrote the affirmation on the back of my business card as I went to give it to him I heard that “unlimited mind” speak to me and I realized that he needed more than just an affirmation.  So I took some money out of my wallet and found a paper clip in my purse and attached the money.

I do not share this with you to brag but to show you how the right and perfect thing can show up in your life, my life, and the life of a perfect stranger.  It only happens when we are open to see the possibilities. Those possibilities are everywhere at all times when we understand that we have “the all-encompassing unlimited mind” at our disposal 24-7, 365 days a year, if only we would acknowledge that it exists in us!

Serve the public whenever and wherever you can, you’ll be glad you did!  Let me know where your all-encompassing unlimited mind takes you today!

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“Faith in Mind” [1]
Attributed to: Seng’tsan, 3rd Chinese (Sosan, Zen) Patriarch

When the deep meaning of things is not understood
the mind’s essential peace is disturbed to no avail.

The way is perfect, like vast space
when nothing is lacking and nothing is in excess.
Indeed, it is due to our choosing to accept or reject
that we do not see the true nature of things.
Live neither in the entanglements of outer things,
nor in inner feelings of emptiness.
Be serene without striving for activity in the oneness of things
and such erroneous views will disappear by themselves.
When you try to stop activity to achieve passivity
your very effort fills you with activity.
As long as you remain in one extreme or the other
you will never know oneness.
Those who do not live in the single way
fail in both activity and passivity,
assertion and denial.

These verses may seem to be very confusing at first glance. It seems to be saying in one line that when we do not understand something our mind is “disturbed to no avail” and yet a few lines later we read we are being asked to try not to be bothered with knowing and not knowing, so which is it? Know, not know, understand, not understand? Seems to me that Buddhism is the best philosophy on the planet, knowing and not knowing are both okay. Right can be wrong, and wrong can be right on any given day. Black and white do not exist, life is filled with shades of every color on the spectrum of light.

And yet he writes, “As long as you remain in one extreme or the other you will never know oneness.” Thus many have called this path the “middle way.” That is something I can grasp. I can see that in my life when I have taken my thoughts and feelings too far in one direction or the other I have either been in “heaven” or “hell.” I may choose the heaven over the hell, but eventually even that means that I’ve decided on “preferences.” If you read my previous blog you’ll see how that can cause problems in our lives as well.

So what is the answer? Let’s go back to this line for a minute: The way is perfect, like vast space when nothing is lacking and nothing is in excess. Too much of anything can be a bad thing from too much love which can end up suffocating us or too little love which can end up creating feelings of unworthiness and self-doubt. But just the right amount like these lyrics illustrate “a spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down, in a most delightful way,” as Julie Andrews sang so beautifully in the Mary Poppins movie. Not too much sugar and not too little, just “one spoonful” was just right. The best medicine of life is to find balance and equilibrium though the middle way: Just enough, not too much and not too little in life of challenges, love, contentment, peace, joy, happiness, and sadness.

So when you find yourself moving too far in one direction or the other remember Mary Poppins and your life will be lived “in a most delightful way.” Remember also these words of Seng’tsan, “The way is perfect, like vast space when nothing is lacking and nothing is in excess.” The middle way: Try it I think, like Mary Poppins, you’ll love it!

In gassho,

ingassho

Shokai

[1] Osho (2014) Hsin Hsin Ming, The Zen Understanding of Mind and Consciousness. Osho International Foundation

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