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Posts Tagged ‘Ikkyu’

gold-face-buddha-with-three-pure-precepts-2I never tire of reading the beautiful poetry of the Buddhist monks and Ikkyu is no exception to the rule.  Living a meaningful life also requires us to enjoy the beauty of spring, the sound of music, the laughter of our teachers, friends, and families, the words of our favorite writers, and poets—past and present.

The Center for Spiritual Living in Boca Raton, Florida, gives out little cards with words of wisdom on them.  I found this one today when I opened up the book. “We reap whatever we plant…enough to share and to spare.”

Ikkyu planted so many wonderful thoughts and teachings through his writing and the way he lived his life.  You can as well.  Even if you don’t think you are able to write poetry or prose simply living life as if spring was in the air every day just may inspire someone around you to write a poem with you as their muse.  You never can tell…

The rest of Ikkyu’s verse goes like this:

“But everyone else is afraid to drain its cup.
Heaven is achieved, hell disappears.
I spend the day amid falling blossoms and wind-blown fluff (page 26).”[1]

When was the last time you spent the day amid flowers with your hair blowing in the wind?  Or having to chase down your hat as it blows off your head! When was the last time you “drained your cup” of something or someone who was not helping you move forward in your life with meaning, peace, love, and compassion?

There is another story told about some farmers who were being “bled dry by excessive taxation and corrupt officials (page 30). To stand by them in principal Ikkyu wrote:

Over and over,
Taking and taking
From this village;
Starve them
And how will you live (page 30)?

It sounds like the corrupt officials were NOT living a meaningful life as I see it!  It reminds me of some of the things we are seeing today in our modern world…taking from the poor to make the rich richer.  That is definitely not the way to “live a meaningful life” unless of course your only meaning in life is to get richer and greedier.

Definitely not Ikkyu’s way for sure, not my way, how about you? I never tire of springs great pleasure and it doesn’t cost me a dime!

[1] J. Stevens (1999) Zen Masters A Maverick, a Master of Masters, and a Wandering Poet Ikkyu, Hakuin, Ryokan  Kodansha International: New York

(2) picture by Mitch Doshin Cantor http://www.listeningwiththeeye.squarespace.com

 

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