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Posts Tagged ‘hope’

Moon in a dewdrop cover“If you judge others from your own limited point of view, how can you avoid being mistaken? Furthermore, those who had shortcomings yesterday can act correctly today (page 62).”[1]

Yesterday I went to the Pueblo Cooperative Care Center to sign up as a volunteer.  Around me were so many people, young, old, black, white, some in tattered clothes and one young man with a huge blanket draped around him to protect him from the chill of the morning.  As I viewed them I began to visibly see their “shortcomings” in real life.  They were short of housing, clothing, food, medication, compassion, love, help and mostly hope.

Our society will never be empathetic enough or caring enough to get out of their Mercedes Benz or from behind their seat in an elected political office to see what they are doing when they place their priorities in the new “me to movement” above all else. Yes, more for me, less for you—movement.  But at whose and what expense?

Move the poor out of my city, hide them away behind the fences, mass incarceration of children at the borders, build the wall. Give myself more bonuses and less taxes so there is no money for universal healthcare, living wages, free education in all areas from trade schools to medical schools. Little or no help to decrease the opioid epidemic which is simply a symptom of the above…

Kaz  Tanahashi continues to share Dogen’s ideas: You should understand that there are foolish people who do not take care of themselves because they do not take care of others, and there are wise people who care for others just as they care for themselves (page 63).”[2]

And he finished with this quote:

A teacher of old said:
Two-thirds of your life has passed,
Not polishing even a spot of your source of sacredness.
You devour your life, your days are busy with this and that.
If you don’t turn around at my shout, what can I do (page 63)”[3]

The world is shouting… Who am I today—the wise or the fool? And you—who are you?

Yet who am I to judge—with me and my shortcomings so loudly seen and heard by the world.

[1] Tanahashi, K. (1985) Moon in a Dewdrop Writings of Zen Master Dogen North Point Press: New York
[2] Ibid.
[3] Ibid.

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Why can’t we all just get along?

A FEW GOOD MEN
HIGH ON A HILL IN SOUTH VIETNAM,
A HANDFUL OF MEN ARE GROUPED AS ONE,
JUST A LONELY PLACE THAT WILL BRING NO FAME,
THEY HOLD A POSITION WITHOUT ANY NAME,
KNOWING VC ARE ALL AROUND,
THEY WATCH AND WAIT WITHOUT A SOUND,
HE MUST KNOW HIS JOB AND KNOW IT WELL,
EXPERIENCE IS HIS TEACHER, AND THIS WILL TELL,
EACH HAS A THOUGHT OF HIS HOME FAR AWAY,
HOPING AND PRAYING HE’LL RETURN SOMEDAY,
WHAT SLEEP HE GETS IS ON THE LAND,
A HELMET HIS PILLOW, ALWAYS AT HAND,
HIS WORK GOES ON NIGHT AND DAY,
HE DOES A MIGHTY BIG JOB FOR SO LITTLE PAY,
I THINK BY NOW YOU KNOW WHO I MEAN,
THIS COULD ONLY BE A U.S. MARINE.
Corporal, Timothy J. Ives
07/11/1946-04/30/1967

Written by a high school buddy of my cousin Art Bird a few days before he lost his life in Viet Nam in 1967.

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War is breaking out in the Middle East again and in Central America the conditions are so treacherous for the regular citizens they are sending their children on pilgrimages to America by walking a thousand miles to our borders and turning themselves in to the Border Patrol. Being in an American detention center is safer for them than being in their own beds in their own homes in their own countries. How sad a state of affairs is that?

So we are hearing “war cries” once again from some in our country to fight in the Middle East and to “fight” back the influx of women and children trying to escape a life of fear and hell in their home countries. Today in Guatemala 1 out of every 14 people have a chance to be murdered. If you are a parent what lengths would you go to in order to save your children?

In the book, Peace Pilgrim her Life and Work in Her Own Words, in Chapter 9 “Extensions of Pacifism,” she quotes Herman Goering, at the Nuremberg Trials:

Why of course people don’t want war. Why should some poor slob on a farm want to risk his life in a war when the best he can get out of it is to come back to his farm in one piece? Naturally the common people don’t want war: neither in Russia, nor in England, nor for that matter in Germany. That is understood. But after all, it is the leaders of a country who determine the policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy, or a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship. Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country (page 114-15).[1] [Emphasis mine.]

Sound Familiar?

Pastor Martin Niemoller

Pastor Martin Niemoller

Yet in all countries and in all times there were those who spoke out, who stood up to the powers that be for peace even if it meant their own death or imprisonment. Pastor Martin Niemöller (1892-1984) is perhaps best remembered for his oral admission of personal guilt and condemnation of the bystander during WWII. Many years after his release by the Allied Forces from a prison camp in which he was interned he was elected president of the World Council of Churches.

The exact words that he is credited with are in dispute; their sentiment is not:

First they came for the communists and I did not speak out because I was not a communist.

Then they came for the trade unionists and I did not speak out because I was not a trade unionist.

Then they came for the Jews and I did not speak out because I was not a Jew.

Finally, they came for me and there was no one left to speak out.[2]

 

What will you do for the children, for peace, for the planet? Turn a blind eye and go shopping at Saks or Bloomies, or K-Mart? Write your elected officials, carry a sign, vote them out? Pass the buck, see with a blind eye, and turn off the news? Save the children, save the planet? Get elected to office yourself?

The Gateless Gate

The great path has no gates,

Thousands of roads enter it.

When one passes through this gateless gate

He walks freely between heaven and earth (page 79)[3].

 

If it is to be—it is up to me! Hope lives eternal…Which gate will you take?

 

[1] Peace Pilgrim Her life and Work In her Own Words, Friends of Peace Pilgrim and Ocean Tree Books, 2004.

[2] http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/414633/Martin-Niemoller

[3] The Little Book of Zen Haiku, Koans, Sayings, (2001) edited by Manuela Dunn Mascetti. The Book Laboratory, Inc. Fall River Press: NY, NY

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I began thinking this morning about writing a new blog on my series on peace and just could not come up with a good idea, so I decided to go visit my friend who is in the hospital. I am helping her learn some breathing techniques and some Unity principles on health and healing so she can get back on her feet for GOOD! I figured the driving would clear my mind and sure enough it did.

When I got in the car I turned on the radio and one of my favorite Bette Midler songs came on, kismet you might say! She was singing From a Distance what a beautiful treatise on peace. So in case you haven’t heard it lately here is a link to the song and the words [emphasis and changes mine]. http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/bettemidler/fromadistance.html

“From A Distance”

From a distance the world looks blue and green,
and the snow-capped mountains white.
From a distance the ocean meets the stream,
and the eagle takes to flight.

From a distance, there is harmony,
and it echoes through the land.
It’s the voice of hope, it’s the voice of peace,
it’s the voice of every man.

From a distance we all have enough,
and no one is in need.
And there are no guns, no bombs, and no disease,
no hungry mouths to feed.

From a distance we are instruments
marching in a common band.
Playing songs of hope, playing songs of peace.
They’re the songs of every man [person].
God is watching us. God is watching us.
God is watching us from a distance [from within].

From a distance you look like my friend,
even though we are at war.
From a distance I just cannot comprehend
what all this fighting is for.

From a distance there is harmony,
and it echoes through the land.
And it’s the hope of hopes, it’s the love of loves,
it’s the heart of every man [person].

It’s the hope of hopes, it’s the love of loves.
This is the song of every man [person].
And God is watching us, God is watching us,
God is watching us from a distance [from within].
Oh, God is watching us, God is watching.
God is watching us from a distance [from within].

This is given prayerfully from my house to your house this Memorial Day Weekend in memory of all those who have been killed or injured in a war ever, anywhere on planet earth and beyond.  Namaste…

In gassho, Shokai

ingassho

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Yikes, another year coming to an end and I haven’t even completed all the goals and to-do lists for 2012!  The older I get the faster time goes and the more fun I’m having the faster time goes. When I am feeling sad, mad, bad, or bored the time seems to be endless dragging like the car with a flat tire screeching and thumping along. Sometimes I feel as though—soon there will be no time left at all.

Some people think the world will end in a few days as they follow the Mayan Calendar.  When I’m feeling down some days I hope that the Mayan’s were right, but when I’m feeling great I’m sure hoping they are not!

So how do I plan for the next minute, hour, day, week, or year?  Do I just let it come as it comes, do I set my goals? Do I plan, organize, collate, separate, and loudly pronounce “the New Year is coming!”  But who made up time anyway?  I’ve always figured that we had time just so we didn’t have to do everything all at once.  It was a great idea to be able to stretch things out, take one thing at a time or simply rest and relax and say the heck with it all and pull the covers up over my head!

Several years ago someone thought of a great idea and they began publishing a magazine entitled “Simple Life.”  I’ve looked at it several times and even found some wonderful things in it. I even decided to take up the mantle.  And so, over the years I have moved from a 4 bedroom home to a 2 bedroom home and I even lived in a one-room efficiency apartment.  I especially loved that (so little to clean!) until the squirrels moved into the attic and kept me up all night dancing and prancing like a family of sugar plum fairies dancing in the night.

But without my goals I feel like I would be a rudderless boat just floating around the ocean.  I can’t imagine a life without goals.  Even the Buddha had goals he searched and searched for enlightenment for many years, through many pathways, until he discovered it.  Then he continued to teach and spread the word to anyone who wanted to listen.

In the Metta Sutra of Shakyamuni Buddha he says, “May all beings be happy. May they be joyous and live in safety. All living beings, whether weak or strong, in high or middle, or low realms of existence, small or great, visible or invisible, near or far, born or to be born, may they all be happy.”  Is this yet another goal?

Jesus had goals.  He set down the Beatitudes didn’t he?  He taught, shared, prayed, and lived a life for others to emulate.  It is written in Matthew 5:18-19 just after the listing of the Beatitudes these words:

“For truly I tell you, until heaven and earth disappear, not the smallest letter, not the least stroke of a pen, will by any means disappear from the Law until everything is accomplished. Therefore anyone who sets aside one of the least of these commands and teaches others accordingly will be called least in the kingdom of heaven, but whoever practices and teaches these commands will be called great in the kingdom of heaven.”

To me it sounds like a very powerful set of goals that he was laying out for each of His followers to begin accomplishing.

It looks like even Steven Covey with his books and CDs and DVDs filled with tips on goal setting was just following in the path of those two great masters.  So you may want to set goals for your life, live those goals freely and fully, and then watch your life move in the direction of those things that you have laid out.

If you don’t set goals you may be letting the winds of fate, and time, and circumstance rock you like that small boat on the Atlantic trying to cross the sea to a new land.  Life is a magical experiment that needs to be played with, tested, viewed, reviewed and begun each moment of each day of each year.  And who cares if my goals from last year have not been finished or fulfilled I can try to get them done in 2013. I can throw them out like that old warn out pair of sneakers I let go of last week or I can just wish and hope and dream that my life gets better rather than worse.

But regardless of which way I chose, the path is mine to live.

 

 

 

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