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Emerson: The meaning of good and bad, of better and worse, is simply helping or hurting (page 32).[1]

Zen Buddhism: The Three Pure Preceptsif-you-wan-to-go-fast
A Disciple of the Buddha vows to not create evil.
A disciple of the Buddha vows to practice good
A disciple of the Buddha vows to actualize good for others.

As you can see in life there is always a way to distinguish between bad words and good words. Simply focus on how the words made you feel and how they made others feel.  If your actions are helping someone and not hurting or hindering them then they are “good.”  If your words are uplifting, reassuring, and kind then they are “good” Thus those words and actions do not create evil.

It probably took some time in your life to be able to identify what actions were “good” and which ones were “bad.”  I suppose when we were very little and we had a temper tantrum and mom or dad sent us to our room after a while we came to the conclusion that having that temper tantrum was not a “good” idea, but a “bad” idea.

Conversely when we helped pick up the toys or shared our snack with someone we got praised by mom and dad and maybe even got another helping of ice cream.  Thus we came to the conclusion that sharing was a “good” idea.

It is too bad that as adults we have often forgotten those simple lessons from our childhood and have fallen into the trap of “bad” behavior at times such as belittling, bullying, cheating, or even stealing from someone.  We literally have forgotten the meaning of the words good and bad.  We have forgotten the power that those words can hold either good or bad.

The power in the “good” words are that they heal, help, uplift, and can improve self-confidence in a person when you use them.  I have a little handout in my management classes that I share with the participants and on the paper it says, “I caught you doing something right.”  They are required to give out 2 or 3 of them during the training writing some specific thing they caught the person doing.  It can be something as simple as sharing their lunch with someone.  You can actually see the person’s face light up when they get a card, sometimes you can even hear a thank you or a squeal or a laugh.

Remember the disciple of the Buddha vows to practice good and actualize good for others! What a wonderful world this would be if we all practiced that simple idea throughout the day every day!

Let’s try it this week.  Let me know how many “I caught you doing something right” cards you gave out and what the responses were.  I bet I will hear the squeals of joy all the way in Delray!

In gassho, Shokai

[1] Floris, O. Inspiration & Wisdom from the pen of Ralph Waldo Emerson. www.odeliafloris.com

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