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Posts Tagged ‘Eightfold Path’

 

Bhikkhu Nyanasobhano starts this chapter with an interesting thought, “…a fundamental purpose of many of us is the search for love, especially romantic love.  This is often the floor to which people fall after the collapse of other dreams (page 31-32).[1]

All of us have fallen into this trap and why not?  Every ad on TV shows people in love, loving their spouses, children, pets, cars, clothes, and more.  Its hidden message is you’ll “love” our product it will make you happy and fulfill your dreams.  It’s like grasping for the gold ring on the merry-go-round at the boardwalk.  If you don’t catch it—you are mad and sad.  If you do catch it—you quickly realize that it is not made of gold at all but of brass with little or no intrinsic value in it.

He says, “We must know ourselves before we presume to know another and demand quotas of romance, tenderness, and attention. If love is to refresh us and uplift us at all it must be realistically considered and fantastically worshipped.  Through the day-to-day practice of basic virtues, it should be made better, made sound, made right. To do that we should examine all its aspects in ourselves and discard the unhelpful—the admixtures of conceit, greed, self-importance, etc (page 36-37).”[2]

To love and be loved is the greatest gift of all and with his advice you can experience it in its simplest form without clinging, grabbing, or fearing.

Love is never the poorer for being accompanied by wisdom.  …the perfection of love means ultimately, the perfection of one’s own character (page 39).  No good thing prospers long in ignorance.  The better we understand this flawed universe the more skillfully we can live, and the happier we will be. We love best when we do not love out of desperation (page 41).[3]

And to find this wisdom Jay invites us to live our lives by using the Buddhist Eightfold Path shown below from his blog. I hope you’ll check it out at:

https://bluejayblog.wordpress.com/2015/09/13/leaders-on-the-eightfold-path/

8 fold Path bluejayblog

Since there is “nothing higher to live for” just imagine what all of our relationships would look like if we all walked the Eightfold Path!  Love in all its flavors, iterations, names, and relationships would be a pleasure and although we may see a little bump in the road now and then it would only be a bump and not a mountain or a crater!

Try it and let me know how it goes!

[1]Nyanasobhano, B. (1998) Landscapes of wonder Discovering Buddhist Dhamma in the world around us. Somerville Massachusetts: Wisdom Publications

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ibid.

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Everyone has thoughts about life and death. Ethical, religious, and spiritual people all have rules, precepts, principles and laws covering their beliefs about the individuals and the society’s role in life and death, peace and war. The first of the 10 Grave Precepts in Buddhism is “Not Killing,” the last of the Eightfold Path is Respect Life. Robert Aitken writes about this in his wonderful book, The Mind of Clover.

The Hinayana view of “Not Killing” is just that. The extreme limit of such literal interpretation is not Buddhist at all, but the Jain faith, whose monks filter all water before drinking it, in order to protect the microscopic animals that might otherwise be swallowed (page 16).[1]

I would not suggest that to be an ethical, religious, or spiritual person you would need to go to this extreme. Aitken explains why such extreme beliefs can be troubling.

They must assume that a sharp distinction exists between the animal and vegetable worlds; otherwise they could not feed themselves. Strict vegetarians, too, tend to fall into this trap, it seems to me. It is not possible to evade the natural order of things: everything in the universe is in symbiosis with every other thing.
Doctrines, including Buddhism, are meant to be used. Beware of them taking life of their own, for then they use us (page 17).[2]

So what do we do about this problem—to be in this life but not of it. To use the Buddhist principles to create a life of peace, love, and compassion in us and through us each day is a challenge. Aitken suggests that first we must start with being compassionate with ourselves. Whether it is while we are sitting on the cushion, washing the dishes, dealing with others, or giving ourselves time to “chill out” first respect your own life and be kind to yourself then it will be much easier to do it with others.

Finally, spread that good will to all life, plants, animals, and ultimately planet Earth. Recycle your garbage, support legislation that protects the water, air, and ground that we need to survive. Work for fairness and equality for all people in all places around the world. Your actions in these areas will show that you are following the Eightfold Path and especially that of respecting life.

I got a bumper sticker for my car and one for my refrigerator a few months ago that says “DO NO HARM.” I just love it! Every time I go into my refrigerator I see the bumper sticker and it reminds me to respect life—mine and others! Here is the link for you to use to get one of your own. They are free so no excuses can be made! On their website they even say: Please do not send money! We do not accept monetary donations! Please support the movement by doing no harm and if you can, please spread the “Do No Harm” message. (http://www.donoharm.us/id3.html)

I hope you will take the time to go there and get yourself a bumper sticker. Then each time you get into your car or open your refrigerator door you will be reminded of the Eightfold Path of Buddhism and its teachings on “Respect Life.” Let me know how that works out for you! The results can be life changing and can potentially help save the planet and maybe even the human race.

In gassho,

ingassho

Shokai

[1] Aitken, R. (1984) The Mind of Clover, Essays in Zen Buddhist Ethics. North Point Press: NY, NY

[1] Ibid.

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Browsing my email this morning I came across a discussion digest from a wonderful organization that I belong to the Association for Contemplative Mind in Higher Education (ACMHE).  It led me to a section on their website “The Tree of Contemplative Practices” which led me back to my talks on ethics and the first of the Eightfold Path, “Know the truth.”

Below is the picture of the tree and the items on the tree reflect some of the contemplative practices “currently in use in secular organizations and academic settings.” These practices help us to “know the truth.”  And when they are integrated into our lives will help us “live the truth.” Many of the practices listed on the tree are linked to areas that are directly related to areas of ethical conduct and practice. Some of them are listed below:

  • Justice issues
  • Volunteering
  • Loving-kindness
  • Deep listening
  • Establishing a sacred/personal space for self and others

ACHME describes the tree thus:

The roots of the tree encompass and transcend differences in the religious traditions from which many of the practices originated, and allow room for the inclusion of new practices that are being created in secular contexts.

The branches represent different groups of practices.

The Tree of Contemplative Practices ACMHE

When used and contemplated they can help us know what is true for us and provide us with simple practices to help us live an ethical life.

My goal this week is to choose one area and focus on it knowing that doing this will help me maintain peace, love, and compassion in my life and hopefully make this a better place in which to live.  When you go to the link you will find a blank tree there that you can copy and print and put your personal contemplative practices on the tree.  This may help you focus on your opportunities to merge your ethical, spiritual, and practical life into one union of knowing the truth and being one with it.

In gassho,

Shokai

ingassho

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