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Posts Tagged ‘discriminating mind’

If you wish to move in the one way
do not dislike even the world of senses and ideas.
Indeed, to accept them fully is identical with true enlightenment.
The wise man strives to no goals
but the foolish man fetters himself.
There is one dharma, truth, law, not many;
distinctions arise
from the clinging needs of the ignorant.
To seek mind with the discriminating mind
is the greatest of all mistakes.[1]

Well, if one thing is true about the Buddhist sutras it is that they are a mystery and a puzzle and an enigma all rolled into one. They challenge our logical rational mind to the nth degree and make us wonder sometimes if this path is worth the work?!

First we are being told that if we “wish to move in the one way do not dislike even the world of senses and ideas.” Next we’re told that “to seek mind with the discriminating mind” is a great mistake. In order to move in “one way” rather than another—to choose whether we are to “dislike” something—is required to determine whether we even “dislike” something. Yikes!

These verses are much like the koans which we study in our branch of Buddhism. I am working on one right now and have been for the past 6 months to no avail…” Two men walking in the rain, one gets wet the other does not.” The only thing I am sure of is that life is a koan and an enigma and that is why this sutra also says, “To seek mind with the discriminating mind is the greatest of all mistakes.”

There have been hundreds of times in my life, both personal and professional when I thought through a problem with care, research, help from a therapist or a friend, decided upon the solution and the action and then BAM it all blew up in my face. And there have been other times that I quickly went with my gut, no research, no contemplation, no therapist, and it worked out GREAT! No discriminating mind.

I have lived a life where there were goals written down, organized, prioritized, and achieved and then there were times I set goals that fettered me to something that was not good for me and caused pain and suffering in my life and in the lives of those around me. I have been on all sides and the 10 directions that are described in the verses of this sutra.

And so…what do I do. Simply sit! Yes, I sit each day and calm the body, mind, and spirit. It is to look for nothing and when something appears in the mind and body I simply breathe into it and let it go. The universe is a wonderful thing and the right and perfect outcome will appear on its own. It may come from a friend, co-worker, or family member. It can come from an email or something you saw on the internet or TV or read in a book, but come it will on its own terms and in its own time—not yours. Accept what is—as it is and as it comes—that is what Buddhism is all about for me.

I simply let go of the clinging and wait and watch to see what the universe brings me! How awesome is that!

In gassho,

ingassho
Shokai

[1]Osho (2014) Hsin Hsin Ming, The Zen Understanding of Mind and Consciousness. Osho International Foundation

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