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Posts Tagged ‘awakened’

In his chapter on “Training in Zen” Shibayama writes:

…they first start with an extremely intense religious quest; then comes hard, strong-willed search and discipline, which will be followed by spiritual crises, or a sense of the abyss; and finally, they experience the moment of awakening.  These are the inner processes they generally go through (page 39).images

I know if you are reading this that you too have gone through some or all of these steps. I too have done so and when I’ve had that moment of awakening I think that my life will have changed dramatically and only the good can come and I will be able to “walk on water.”  Alas, when I tried I was soon over my head in it and had to swim to shore.  This is not failure but the reality of being in a human experience.

To fail and then to get up again and go back to the reading and meditation and mindfulness strengthens my determination and quickens my compassion for others who are struggling and swimming against the tide in this physical world of challenges and joys.

Life is like a roller coaster and sometimes we are on the up-hill ride slowly moving and creeping to the top of the tracks and then all of sudden we feel the elation and before we know it we’re on the down hill portion of the roller coaster speeding faster and faster as the wind blows our hair and we can hear ourselves screaming.

Not to worry what you learned through these two experiences will help you grow in to the Buddha that you are.  Shakyamuni Buddha lived a life of luxury that many could never experience and he left it to find the truth about life.  During those times he had great ups and downs in the physical, psychological, and emotional challenges of being alive.  But in his final awakening he discovered the middle way.  Not grasping upon awakening or experiencing Samadhi but simply allowing yourself to relax and focus on your breath and the peace that you can hold in body, mind, and spirit. He realized that everything is one.

To be in the moment, to realize that we are and can experience being one with all the good that is in the universe is available to everyone.  It gives us the clarity, drive, and ability to go out into the world and make a difference, to fulfil our Buddhist promise to live a life of peace, love, and compassion toward self and others.

The beginning of the universe is now, for all things are at this moment being created, and the end of the universe is now, for all things are at this moment passing away. (Watts, 1958, p. 52) ~ Alan Watts, Zen teacher

Just a thought to ponder on while you wile away the minutes and hours of your day on your spiritual quest.

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Eihei Dogen wrote, “The body and mind of the Buddha way is grass, trees, tiles, and pebbles, as well as wind, rain, water, and fire.  To turn them around and make them the buddha way—this is the aspiration for enlightenment. (page 47)”[1] What an expansive idea this is for most people.  In Pali “Buddha” literally means “awakened one.”  To be awakened means that we see everything as a part of the whole, where no separation exists between the natural world and the human world: All is one.

This principle is taught in the metaphysical Christian churches as well where we learn that there is “no place where God is not.” That the creation or life force is the same in all things and Shakyamuni Buddha or Jesus Christ was an embodied being that recognized this and lived a life that demonstrated it.  The life force energy is within us to be co-creators of a world of peace, love, and compassion for all things.

Although we may not recognize this within ourselves Dogen goes on to write, “It is the buddha way altogether at the beginning, in the middle, and at the end.  It is like journeying a long distance; one step is within one thousand mile, one thousand steps are within one thousand miles.  The first step and the one-thousandth step are different but are equally within the one thousand miles (page47-48).”[2]  There is no need for you to go on a long journey to “find” the Buddha or the Christ within. Whether you have gone within through prayer, meditation, or sitting one time or one thousand times they are equal but different places on the journey.

I asked my mother one day if she thought that “God was everywhere present.”  She said of course.  Then I pointed to the lamp and said, “So God is in the lamp then.”  She said, “Don’t be silly God is not in the lamp.”  And, of course, I replied, “How could that be if you just told me that God was everywhere present, and the lamp is somewhere then God must be in the lamp.”  That blew her mind and she went back to her knitting.

And yet, we all try to separate the idea of oneness by dividing it into categories of animate and inanimate things; between sentient and non-sentient things.  Since we live inside these tiny bodies which have skin and bones and create separation it is hard for us to see the oneness in all things–yet it is there.

Robert E. Kennedy in his wonderful book Zen Spirit, Christian Spirit (page 57) quotes John Wu The Golden Age of Zen (page 2)[3] “When all things return to the One, even gold loses its value.  But when the One returns to all things, even the pebbles sparkle.”  When we pray, meditate, or sit we return to the one and we sparkle as well.

So our task for this week is to really look for the oneness in each other, in those animate and inanimate-sentient and non-sentient things:  To look for the fragrance in the cactus and the thorns in the rose; to find something worthwhile in all creatures, large and small and in all beings friendly and unfriendly.  And then we will be “awakened” to the oneness of all things.

Awaken to the beauty of this day, Shokai

Things to focus on this week:

1.  I will begin each day setting my intention to see the beauty in all things.

2.  I will remind myself that I too can be awakened with one step or one thousand the choice is mine!

3.  I will work each day on sitting at least 10 minutes to recognize my oneness with all things.

4.  Lastly, I will keep a journal of the opportunities that have been presented to me so I can keep track of my progress and my opportunities for growth.


[1] Tanahashi, K. Levitt, P. (2013) The Essential Dogen, Writings of the Great Zen Master. Shambhala: Boston, MA

[2] Ibid.

[3] Kennedy, R.E. (1995) Zen Spirit, Christian Spirit, The Place of Zen in Christian Life. Continuum: NY, NY

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