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tea and typewriterWhen I was growing up my mother would never allow us to have coffee, not sure why, but she said not until we were in high school? Hmmmm

So we could have water, milk, juice, soda, and yes tea!  Hot tea or cold tea and Lipton tea, of course.  I learned a lot about tea, as I’ve said, from Aaron Fisher’s book The Way of Tea Reflections on a Life with Tea.  Thus this blog post…

Once I was allowed to drink coffee, I decided that I would try it.  Mom had an old metal coffee pot with a glass window in the top so you could see the coffee perking.  Not sure why that was there but it was fun watching the coffee going up and down in the pot.  Kept me out of trouble for a few minutes anyway!

The day finally came, and I got the coffee cup and the hot pot of coffee off the stove and poured some into the cup.  I saw mom put cream and sugar in her coffee so I figured that was how it was to be fixed before drinking it.  It was very hot and so I figured I’d better blow on it a little before taking my first sip and finally I jumped into the coffee with great expectations.  Yikes!  Was I shocked it was awful, it tasted like mud to me.  It was not light and flavorful like the tea or transparent enough to see to the bottom of the cup. It’s kind of like life our “great expectations” don’t always turn out as we had expected…

Thus I did not drink coffee until I was grown up…I mean really grown up!  I was working in the Emergency Room in the local hospital as a Unit Secretary.  My shift was 3-11 PM on weekends and holidays.  Thus the cafeteria closed at 7 pm and if I wanted a hot drink, I had to drink what was in the nurse’s lounge.  Yes, you guessed it!  A giant old coffee pot filled with that nasty dark concoction!

Such is life and how it affects our eating, drinking, and way of living.  Fisher writes, “The Chinese, always so fond of making lists—of virtues, of bests and worsts, and even of benefits—made a list of the ten virtues of tea and it became common knowledge:

  1. Tea is beneficial to health, as the “Qi” clears all blockages and cures ailments.
  2. Tea helps refresh one after a night of drinking alcohol.
  3. Tea, mixed with other things like nuts or even milk can provide nourishment.
  4. Tea can cool one off in the heat of summer.
  5. Tea helps one slough off all fatigue and drowsiness, promoting an awakened mindset.
  6. Tea purifies the spirit, removes anxiety and nervousness and brings ease and comfort, conducive to meditation.
  7. Tea aids in the digestion of food.
  8. Tea removes all toxins from the body, flushing out the blood and urinary system.
  9. Tea is conducive to longevity, promoting longer, healthier life.
  10. Tea invigorates the body and inspires the mind to creativity (page 54).”[1]

So for me I’m going to drink more TEA!  Can’t wait to see if the benefits of tea can make me healthier, live longer, be more creative and inspired by life!  How about you? Care to join me!?

 

[1] Fisher, Arron, The Way of Tea Reflections on a Life with Tea, Tuttle Publishing, North Clarendon, Vermont, 2010

[2] Picture is from Pixabay website

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Dogen How to Cook Your LifeI was looking on my bookshelves for something to start a new blog on and I noticed how many books I had that had something to do with food and eating from Aaron Fisher’s great book, The Way of Tea, Edward Espe Brown’s book, No Recipe Cooking as Spiritual Practice, and Jan Chozen Bays book, Mindful Eating, and finally Zen Master Dogen’s How to Cook Your Life, From the Zen Kitchen to Enlightenment.  Since we have so many people that are studying Buddhism I thought this might be a different, fun, and informative topic to dive into since we all have to EAT.

Let’s see how we can add some additional Buddhist practices to our lives around the food we eat and share and make.  Shunryu Suzuki Roshi is quoted in Edward Espe Brown’s book, No Recipe, as saying:

“You’re the cook.
When you wash the rice,
Wash the rice.
When you cut the carrots,
Cut the carrots.
When you stir the soup,
Stir the soup.
When you cook, you’re not just working on food—
You’re working on yourself,
You’re working on other people (page xi).”[1]

Thus you can use the opportunities you are given each and every day while you are cooking, or reheating, or eating, or writing a recipe, or choosing something from the menu at a restaurant to practice “working on yourself.”

Aaron Fisher writes in Chapter 1 of The Tao of Tea:

“The best tea sets are in harmony with each other; the best tea is made when the water, tea, and one brewing are in harmony; and the best sessions are created when the host and guests are all in harmony with the environment, tea, water, and teaware. Harmony, more than anything else is how we steep the Tao, brew the Truth, and pour it for others (page 21).”[2]

Finally, Jan Chozen Bays writes these words in her introduction for Mindful Eating a guide to rediscovering a healthy and joyful relationship with food:

“And with a huge and sometimes obsessive preoccupation with health and eating in this brave new world, it is equally easy to fall into a certain kind of ‘nutritionism,’ which makes it difficult to simply enjoy food and all the social functions that revolve around preparing, sharing, and celebrating the miracle of sustenance and the web of life within which we are embedded and upon which we depend (ix-x).”[3]

Thus we begin our adventure into the world of the Tao and the tea, and the food that sustains our lives, our minds, and our bodies. Bon Appetit!

 

[1] Brown, Edward Espe, No Recipe Cooking as Spiritual Practice, Sounds True, Boulder Colorado, 2018, p. xi.
[2] Fisher, Aaron, The Way of Tea Reflections on a Life with Tea, Tuttle Publishing, Singapore, 2010, p. 21.
[3] Bays, Jan Chozen, Mindful Eating, Shambhala, Boulder, Colorado, 2017, p. ix-x

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Once again I opened up this wonderful book “Teachings of Zen” getting ready to write the next section of my newest blog.  It is the first week of our new year 2019 and I was thinking about what I accomplished in 2018 and what I might accomplish in 2019 and then I read these words:

book cover Teachings of Zen Thomas Cleary“You do not plunge into sentiments of the ordinary, nor do you fall into the understanding of the sage. Empty and spiritual, serene and sublime, you do not tarry anywhere but attain fulfillment everywhere.

At this time you should know there is a final statement; only then are you a mature person. Completing the task of the mature person is called transcending the world in the midst of the world, highest of all. Hai-yin (page 142).”[1]

The first paragraph resonated with me as I thought about the juxtaposition of these two ideas. The ideas that we hold in Zen Buddhism are just exactly as Hai-yin describes: empty and yet spiritual, serene and at the same time sublime.  It is exactly like all of our lives the opposites that seem to attract each other, the time on the cushion when we attempt to “empty” the mind and yet think of our spiritual character and that being the reason we are trying to “empty” the mind.  Yikes!  The juxtaposition of the conundrum of the teachings of Buddhism.

And yet Hai-yin ends these thoughts saying: Empty and spiritual, serene and sublime, you do not tarry anywhere but attain fulfillment everywhere…. Completing the task of the mature person is called transcending the world in the midst of the world, highest of all (page 142).”[2]

Your challenge of this year will be transcending the world while being in the midst of it.  Let’s not be bogged down in this process and adding to our troubles and woes.  Let us just be aware of the juxtaposition of life and stroll through it with ease, peace, and compassion for self.  Let’s look down on our selves as if we were out of our bodies simply watching and listening without judgment.  Let’s transcend our fears, likes, and dislikes and remember it’s “just this” and nothing more and nothing less.

[1] Cleary, T. (1998)   Teachings of Zen. New York: Barnes & Noble, Inc by arrangement with Shambhala Publications, Inc

[2] Ibid.

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ying and yangIn Part 8 we talked about True Speech and once we’ve mastered that we can move on to what Pei-chien (1185-1246) calls “Action and Stillness.”  Cleary quotes him as saying “Let your actions be like clouds going by; the clouds going by are mindless.  Let your stillness be as the valley spirit; the valley spirit is undying.  When action accompanies stillness and stillness combines with action, then the duality of action and stillness no longer arises (page 116).”

I just love the visual of the clouds floating by with ease and grace not caring in which direction they go as things out of their “control” move them through the sky or cause them to disappear without worry or frustration.  They simply have no clinging and once in a while they may shed a “tear” or block the sun but before we know it things will change.  Another cloud may have taken its place, or the cloud will have moved so we can see the sun shining once again. Such is life as we realize, “and this too shall pass” like the movement of the clouds and the sun in our lives.

Thus to focus our attention on the stillness, as Pei-chien says, when the action and the stillness combine, they negate each other and neither arises and both arise simultaneously as one.  We can not have success without an action.  We may have finished our college classes and graduated and got hired by a great company.

We may have married the one we love and created a wonderful life partnership.  To be successful there will be times of actions together and actions alone. There will be stillness when all you do is sit quietly in each other’s arms or in each other’s memories if you are far apart. The duality no longer arises, and we are one.

Regardless of how long the new job lasts or the relationship lasts the stillness and the actions will continue in your life. It is how we see them that determines our life course. It is how we deal with them that makes us who we are. It is where we put our focus on the actions or the stillness or both that can make all the difference.

[1] Cleary, T. (1998)   Teachings of Zen. New York: Barnes & Noble, Inc by arrangement with Shambhala Publications, Inc

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My Christmas message from last year is even more important this year. Thanks for reading it.

unlockthedoortolearning

My Christmas Message to the world with love!

” The way to peace is an untrodden path, but it is not unknown. It is the way Jesus gave us. [And the way of the Buddha.]

‘Love thy neighbor as thyself,’ not in word but in deed.

Let all men spend their lives, as Jesus did, helping others.

Let strong men sacrifice their personal advantage so that all may have equal opportunities.

Jesus’ way would be peace itself if we followed it. But men don’t want to change as radically as that! They are still trying to make selfish greed work. In the peace negotiations, nations have jostled for special privilege, and selfish business interests have tried to grab advantages that would be sure to make other men hate them. Senator Vandenberg wrote before the San Francisco Conference that nations were striving for ‘America first,’ ‘England first,’ ‘Russia first,’–the very attitude…

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upaya-gold-buddha-DoshinYueh-lin (thirteenth century) is to have said, “What is true speech? Ninety percent accuracy is not as good as silence (page 104).”[1]

Wow!  I agree with Yueh-lin! There is way too much speech in our world today.  Even though I make my living by speaking and writing even I know that there is too much talking and not enough doing, or meditating, or wondering, or feeding the homeless.  All of which take little or no talking.

I’ve always known that my students learned more by doing then by listening to me flap my jaws for an hour in the seminar.  Thus, I give them time to play a game, watch a YouTube video, or figure out a “what if” scenario, or discover a new way to make something better.  I’ve got them doing a three-breath exercise before each class and before they begin writing, or before they begin that job interview. And most importantly before they say something they will regret.   To say LESS and do MORE…that’s the key to life.  Often the person who talks a big game is simply talking and not doing!  I’m sure we all know that person…I just hope it isn’t you!

The proof is in the pudding?  What the heck does that mean?  The person who is making the pudding or pie or soup is usually thinking quietly of what ingredients are needed to make this wonderful recipe.  It’s not cooked to long or to short, it’s cooked just right!

If we spend more of our time meditating and contemplating, then doing—our life will turn out just right!   Remember true speech should not only be accurate and truthful, but it should be restrained, kind, thoughtful, and sometimes not spoken at all.  And at that note I think I’ll end right here.

[1]

Cleary, T. (1998)   Teachings of Zen. New York: Barnes & Noble, Inc by arrangement with Shambhala Publications, Inc

Photo by Mitch Doshin Cantor, Southern Palm Zen Group.

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Wondering what to do for Bodhi Day to commemorate the day of enlightenment for Shakyamuni Buddha?  Well I found this great information on a website called “do it yourself” and it includes lots of fun things to do beyond just meditating/sitting. Here is the link to this wonderful article https://www.doityourself.com/stry/bodhi-day

The Zen groups that I sit with do similar but different things.  In Boca Raton, Florida, the Southern Palm Zen Group website can be viewed at http://www.floridazen.com and email them at southernpalmzengroup@gmail.com to make a reservation to sit with them. They will be sitting on Saturday the 8th all day starting at 8 AM ET at the Unitarian Universalist Church on St. Andrews.  Please contact the Florida group to make a reservation and let them know you are coming so they can have a cushion or chair ready for you.

The group I sit with in Pueblo, Colorado, will be doing a two part event.  Friday night starting at 6:30 PM till 9 PM MT and all day Saturday sitting from 8 AM til 5 PM MT at the Center for Inner Peace in Pueblo (www.wetmountainsangha.org).  Contact them for additional information or to make a reservation to join them via email wetmountainsangha1@gmail.com.

I hope that wherever you are you will set aside some time to meditate on this special weekend even if there is not a group to sit with near where you live.  The Buddha just sat beneath a tree and while doing so he came up with the “Nobel Eightfold Path” and our “Four Noble Truths.”  I can’t wait to hear from you about what you discovered on this wonderful day of quiet meditation.

Or check out this great website for a place to sit near you: https://findasit.com

In gassho, Shokai gassho

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