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Emerson: “The way to mend the bad world is to create the right world (page 52).”[1]

Zen Robert Aitken: “As Yasutani Roshi used to say, the fundamental delusion of humanity is to suppose that I am here and you are out there (page 169).”[2]

johnglenn-14_Today is the perfect day to begin mending our world.  Yesterday December 8th we saw the passing of John Glenn. This day we celebrate his life.  He was “one of the bravest men in America he took flight as the first man to orbit the Earth in 1962 and at the age of 77 in 1998 became the oldest man in space as a member of the seven-astronaut crew of the shuttle Discovery.[3]

You may not have ever gone into outer space but the most important space and flight that you take begins every morning when you awake.  What trip will you take today?  Where will you travel? Will you expand your outlook and your reach to bigger and better places and things? Remember, as John Glenn might say, “the skies the limit.” Or will you stay on the same trajectory as your past with small thinking, fearful thinking, or will you be thinking less of the “other” who has a different religion, nationality, belief, or goal than you do?

How high can you fly today? How far can you reach to make this a better place to live for all humans, animals, and Mother Earth? As Emerson said, “The way to mend the bad world is to create the right world.”  Do you have “The Right Stuff” like John Glenn had? What “right stuff” can you create today?  Can you look at others today and see them as part of humanity in all its brilliance and color and uniqueness?

Let’s start by mending our own world with all the people and situations around us today…from the grouchy clerk at the grocery store, to the person who cut you off on the highway, to the neighbor who can’t keep his kids off your lawn.  Let’s remember John Glenn today every time we limit ourselves or others and know that if John can do it so can we!  Begin today to “create the right stuff, the right world, the right you.”

May he rest in peace….

ingassho

Shokai

[1] Dillaway, N. (1949) The Gospel of Emerson. The Montrose Press: Wakefield MA

[2] Aitken, R. (1984)  The Mind of Clover Essays in Zen Buddhist Ethics New York: North Point Press

[3] http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2016/12/john-glenn/john-glenn.html#

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Dillaway, N. (1949) The Gospel of Emerson. The Montrose Press: Wakefield MA

[2] Aitken, R. (1984)  The Mind of Clover Essays in Zen Buddhist Ethics New York: North Point Press

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Metta
May I be happy.
May I be free from stress and pain.
May I be free from animosity.
May I be free from oppression.
May I be free from trouble.
May I look after myself with ease.

May all living beings be happy.
May all living beings be free from animosity.
May all living beings be free from oppression.
May all living beings be free from trouble.
May all living beings look after themselves with ease.[1]

Kazuaki Tanahashi, in his book, Zen Chants Thirty-Five Essential Texts with Commentary, writes this:

Buddhaghosa does not recommend that the practitioners simply focus on an aspiration that they themselves be happy or attempt absorption. Instead, the meditators are urged to use themselves as an example: “Just as I want to be happy and dread pain, as I want to live and not die, so do other beings, too.” And thus when we pray the Metta we pray and chant for self and others (page 136).[2]

As we watch the news each evening and see the students on campuses around the country protesting for things that I thought would not still exist in 2015: hiring discrimination, race discrimination, hate speech, unresponsive administrations, sexual assaults, and more. Each of these protesters want for themselves the list of things we recite in the first verse of the Metta and they also want it for everyone else on planet earth. And thus, we chant for them in the second verse.

We can add those in the prison system in America and those in the Middle East who are being killed and bombed in their countries and homes, and in airplanes flying through the air after a family vacation. As a human race we need to work at learning how to live together with our diversity and cultures and religions or we will soon be an extinct species and all that will be left are the birds, the bees, and the trees.

Besides chanting this verse each and every day with love and passion, what can you do each day in your families, homes, workplaces and communities? Think small or think big but please think and then act. You just may save someone’s life. You never know.

May you be happy and find ways to share your happiness with everyone you meet.

In gassho,

ingassho
Shokai

[1] Tanahashi, K. (2015) Zen Chants Thirty-Five Essential Texts with Commentary. Shambhala: Boston & London

[2] Ibid.

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