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Thich Nhat HanhAs I continue to read this awesome book, I am awakened to the power of it right now today in my life.  Dogen quotes from the Regulations for Zen Monasteries about the rules and tips on how to serve the assembly.

He writes, “Just think about how best to serve the assembly, and do not worry about limitations.  If you have unlimited mind, you will have limitless happiness.” This is the way the abbot attentively serves the assembly (page 61).”

What a powerful idea: unlimited mind!

Dogen insists that we all have the all-encompassing “unlimited mind.” He encourages us to open up our minds to all the possibilities that are out there for us. All the challenges, joys, ideas and opportunities that are there for us to recognize and then act upon.  Even if the act is to do something rather simple like an email to an ill friend that might cheer them up or sharing a supportive word to a co-worker or bringing a hot meal over to a sick neighbor.

When I live this day with the idea that I have access to my unlimited mind and all the possibilities that come with it…Wow! When my only job is to be open to see those possibilities and then act on them—how hard is that? If I do it my life can abound with mystery and joy. All I have to do is acknowledge the incredibleness of the world and my all-encompassing unlimited mind and keep my eyes open to see it and hear it.

Just the other day I spoke with a man sitting at the table next to me in Starbucks. He was stuffing envelopes and he shared with me that he earns only 10 cents for each one he stuffs and that is how he gets to eat each day.  As I got ready to leave the universe reminded me of an affirmation that I had shared with my Unity students often: The right and perfect job with the right and perfect pay comes to me today!  So I wrote the affirmation on the back of my business card as I went to give it to him I heard that “unlimited mind” speak to me and I realized that he needed more than just an affirmation.  So I took some money out of my wallet and found a paper clip in my purse and attached the money.

I do not share this with you to brag but to show you how the right and perfect thing can show up in your life, my life, and the life of a perfect stranger.  It only happens when we are open to see the possibilities. Those possibilities are everywhere at all times when we understand that we have “the all-encompassing unlimited mind” at our disposal 24-7, 365 days a year, if only we would acknowledge that it exists in us!

Serve the public whenever and wherever you can, you’ll be glad you did!  Let me know where your all-encompassing unlimited mind takes you today!

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Kermit_the_FrogHaiku for you all to enjoy from one of our Zen students studying “behind the fence.”

Happy is the frog
that has been quenched by the rain.
it’s been a long drought.

Hard rain fell last night
A hot sun rose this morning
bringing rain lillies.
–Wes

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Bhikkhu Nyanasobhano starts this chapter with an interesting thought, “…a fundamental purpose of many of us is the search for love, especially romantic love.  This is often the floor to which people fall after the collapse of other dreams (page 31-32).[1]

All of us have fallen into this trap and why not?  Every ad on TV shows people in love, loving their spouses, children, pets, cars, clothes, and more.  Its hidden message is you’ll “love” our product it will make you happy and fulfill your dreams.  It’s like grasping for the gold ring on the merry-go-round at the boardwalk.  If you don’t catch it—you are mad and sad.  If you do catch it—you quickly realize that it is not made of gold at all but of brass with little or no intrinsic value in it.

He says, “We must know ourselves before we presume to know another and demand quotas of romance, tenderness, and attention. If love is to refresh us and uplift us at all it must be realistically considered and fantastically worshipped.  Through the day-to-day practice of basic virtues, it should be made better, made sound, made right. To do that we should examine all its aspects in ourselves and discard the unhelpful—the admixtures of conceit, greed, self-importance, etc (page 36-37).”[2]

To love and be loved is the greatest gift of all and with his advice you can experience it in its simplest form without clinging, grabbing, or fearing.

Love is never the poorer for being accompanied by wisdom.  …the perfection of love means ultimately, the perfection of one’s own character (page 39).  No good thing prospers long in ignorance.  The better we understand this flawed universe the more skillfully we can live, and the happier we will be. We love best when we do not love out of desperation (page 41).[3]

And to find this wisdom Jay invites us to live our lives by using the Buddhist Eightfold Path shown below from his blog. I hope you’ll check it out at:

https://bluejayblog.wordpress.com/2015/09/13/leaders-on-the-eightfold-path/

8 fold Path bluejayblog

Since there is “nothing higher to live for” just imagine what all of our relationships would look like if we all walked the Eightfold Path!  Love in all its flavors, iterations, names, and relationships would be a pleasure and although we may see a little bump in the road now and then it would only be a bump and not a mountain or a crater!

Try it and let me know how it goes!

[1]Nyanasobhano, B. (1998) Landscapes of wonder Discovering Buddhist Dhamma in the world around us. Somerville Massachusetts: Wisdom Publications

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ibid.

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Shibayama writes next about The Four Maxims:

  1. Transmission outside scriptures
  2. Not relying on letters
  3. Pointing directly to one’s Mind
  4. Attainment of Buddhahood by seeing into one’s Nature (page 19-20)[1]

First, we’ll write about number one: Transmission outside scriptures.  In our previous chapter we talked about the satori experience.  Notice that he uses the word “experience” here not knowledge, not understanding, not wisdom, but the palpable “experience” of the teachings of Zen.  If you’ve never had an actual “satori” experience in this life or if you may have had one or more than one in this life time that’s nice.

What is important as a student of Buddhism is to begin to bring the Zen principles or your “satori” experience into your daily life.  We do this by taking the opportunity to “be” peace, love, and compassion without thinking—simply be it!

He writes:

It is therefore the satori experience that can give life to these scriptures.  It is impossible to attain satori by reading the sutras on the scholastic level.  Once an experience is expressed in a conceptual form, it assumes its own objectivity which can be independently treated.  Thus there is the danger of misunderstanding the concept as the experiential fact itself, and the experience itself will be forgotten and finally be dead.  Zen is flatly against such a tendency and strongly warns us that we should not be attached to any of the scriptures which are likely to be lifeless records (page 21).[2]

Thus, we are put into a conundrum how do we live our principles if he’s telling us there is the “danger of misunderstanding the concept” and confusing it with the experience itself.  As we look back on this idea we see the Buddha simply holding up a lotus flower and his disciple Mahakasyapa was immediately enlightened.

Dew drops on a lotus leaf(1)Our friends from Buddha Groove write beautifully about this:

Historical records show that the flower the Buddha held up at the sermon was a lotus flower, which is associated with Buddhism to this day. The lotus is known for its great beauty, but it is also unique in that it requires thick mud and muck in which to extend its roots so that it can grow and eventually yield flowers. It is because of this thick mud and muck—not in spite of it—that the beautiful lotus blooms.[3]

Thus, it is our experiences in life living the principles of Buddhism in peace, love, and compassion toward all—not just humans—but to all living things on earth including the earth itself that Buddhism is all about! Live it, love it, be it…

Let me know how it goes!

[1] Ibid.

[2] Ibid.

[3] https://www.buddhagroove.com/the-flower-sermon/

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In Chapter 2 Abbot Zenkei Shibayama writes about the characteristics of one aspect of Zen called satori and how it shows up in other religions.  It is such a joy to read about the inclusivity of the teachings and practices of Zen Buddhism regardless of whether you consider yourself a Buddhist, Jew, Muslim, Christian, or of no faith at all.

The Shambhala Dictionary of Buddhism and Zen defines the word satori as a Zen term for the experience of awakening (enlightenment or kensho).

Shibayama goes on to write: When Zen is seen in such a broad sense, Zen means the Truth, or the Absolute; it is not limited to Buddhism alone, but is the basis of all religions and all philosophies. In this sense, Zen does not remain simply the core of Buddhism, but it works to deepen and revive any religion or philosophy.  For instance, there can be Christian Zen, or Taoistic Zen; there can be Zen interpretations of Christianity or of Taoism (page 16).

And if you take a look at all the worlds major religions today they all include some form of meditation and sitting in the quiet for contemplation. Robert E. Kennedy, S.J. is a practicing psychotherapist, a Zen teacher, and a Roman Catholic priest who has written two wonderful books joining the Christian and Zen principles Zen Spirit, Christian Spirit and Zen Gifts to Christians. They are perfect examples of what Shibayama wrote in the 1970’s!

Shibayama also talks about its flexibility.

Due to its transcendental and fundamental nature, Zen is not restricted by any fixed ideas or customs, but expresses itself freely, making creative use of words and ideas. In this way their own culture may be deepened and given new significance and life, based on Truth fundamental for all mankind (page 17).

 

He concludes this section by saying:

Up to this point in this essay I have sought to explain the position of Zen in Buddhism and to indicate the role it can play in religion, philosophy, and culture. They maintain that Zen as the Truth itself, in the broadest sense, should be understood and used by all mankind because it can help build and refine the character of the individual and can deepen thought (page 19).

I too believe this is true.  As we sit and meditate on a daily basis we discover things about ourselves that we might not have without the knowledge of the Buddha’s satori (awakening).  Through my meditation practice I have begun to live a life of peace, love, and compassion, with flashes of creativity and spontaneity that have made my life so much easier, fulfilling, creative, and fun.  Annie Nov. 27.15 (2)I am becoming the person I’ve always wanted to be, the person my dog Annie always knew I was.  Thanks Annie…

 

 

Footnote: Shibayama, Z. (1970) A Flower Does Not Talk Zen Essays. Charles E. Tuttle Co.: Vermont & Tokyo Japan

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Yuanwu starts out as most good Zen teachers do by saying, “Here at my place there is no Zen to explain and no Path to transmit.”  Then they go about quickly explaining the “nothing.”  In this section of his book he, of course, does exactly that!  How great that the ancestors worked so hard to keep us on our toes about “nothing.”bhante-gunaratana

Within each of us is the “fundamental matter that is inherent in everyone (page 67).”[1]  What we might call in Unity that divine spark or goodness within us, that oneness with all things big and small, animal, mineral, and vegetable!  And when we forget that we are a divine spark of all there is we can easily fall into those traps of greed, anger, jealousy, attachments, contrived actions, confusion, and false sentiments, so Yuanwu says!

Who wants to fall into all of those traps? Not me that’s for sure!  So, what can we do?  What does Yuanwu suggest?  “You do not exert any mental effort: you go along freely with the natural flow, without any grasping or rejecting.  This is the real esoteric seal (page 68).[2]

Finally, he writes, “Bearing this esoteric seal is like carrying a lamp hidden in the darkness as you roam through the world without longing or fear—it is all the realm of your own great liberation, continuing forever without interruption (page 68).”[3]  Just this!  We simply deal with whatever comes our way each and every moment in the most appropriate and helpful way we can. Shine your “light” onto the situation and all darkness must disappear. That’s the law.

You can turn up that light at any time by simply sitting and taking time each day to encounter that quiet place in body, mind, and spirit.  H. Emilie Cady in her Unity book, Lessons in Truth wrote: Every man must take time daily for quiet and meditation. In daily meditation lies the secret of power.  No one can grow in either spiritual knowledge or power without it…  No one would ever dream of becoming a master in music except by spending some time daily alone with music (page 7).[4]

Give yourself the present of being alone in the present moment as long and as often as you can.  The more you do that the brighter the hidden lamp in you will shine for all to see.  Be the light that lights up the room, the road, the town, and the world! Stop trying and simply be it! Simply Shine!

[1] Cleary J.C. and Cleary, T. (1994) Zen Letters Teachings of Yuanwu. Boston & London: Shambhala

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Cady, H. E. (1902 1st Printing) Lessons in Truth. Unity Village, MO: Unity House

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My little rescue dog Annie has been added as a new character in a cartoon series entitled Dharma Pets by Jozan one of our talented men sitting with our Southern Palm Zen Group “behind the fence.” Annie is the little large eyed doggie in the middle.  Jozan is looking for a sponsor if you know of anyone who would like to help him get his cartoons out into the world and even make them into a greeting card series please let me know.  In gassho, Shokai

Dharma Pets New Friends Annie

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