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Archive for October, 2019

Dharma Pets New Friends AnnieJohn Steven’s goes on to write this about Hakuin’s motto in his book Zen Masters: “Meditation in the midst of action is a billion times superior to meditation in stillness (page 76).”

Steven’s continues with these thoughts from Hakuin’s teacher Shoju: “If you can maintain your presence of mind in a city street teeming with violent activity, in a cremation ground amid death and destruction, and in a theater surrounded by noise and distraction, then, and only then, are you a true practitioner of Zen (page 76).”[1]

Alas, the world of 2019 exactly replicates Shoju’s description of the 17th century.  Have we not learned anything from our ancestors?   Currently our world is filled with violence, ethnic cleansing, poverty, and famine.  Image how your life would be if within this chaos you could hold your center and you could focus on the task at hand.

Imagine that you could actually see and experience the beauty of the flowers and trees, or the glistening of the snow after a storm.   Imagine that you could appreciate the uniqueness of the faces of the people around you through eyes of compassion and universal love. Imagine that you could be at peace even in the most difficult of situations.  Finally, imagine that you can see every situation with clarity and opened eyes, opened mind, and an opened heart.

In every tragedy there seems to be one person who has the focus of mind to jump into the river to save a person from drowning, to stop their car and pull a person out of a burning vehicle, or to begin CPR on someone in need.  You might be thinking that’s NOT meditation! If mediation is defined as having full focus on your breath… there can’t be a “fuller focus” then doing that which is needed in the moment!

Be here now! Meditation in the moment and in motion…and while you’re at it how about bringing along a friend!

 

[1] Stevens.J (1999) Zen Masters A Maverick, a Master of Masters, and a Wandering Poet Ikkyu, Hakuin, Ryokan Kodansha International: New York

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gasshoThe next section of this wonderful book Zen Masters a Maverick, a Master of Masters, and a Wandering Poet, goes into the life of the teacher and poet Hakuin.  He spent his life moving from one great teacher to another studying, working, and living the life of a Buddhist monk and eventually acclaimed teacher and poet and more.

Stevens’ writes: Hakuin-style Zen was based on his lengthy quest and his forceful character—”Our master moved like a bull and glared like a tiger.” One of his disciples wrote in awe. “Never be satisfied with small attainments (page 73).”[1]

Too often our self-image is lived through the eyes of another such as a parent or spouse or teacher and thus we believe what they say about us more than we believe in our own abilities, dreams, and desires.  We give our life over to others and that makes it so easy to give up our own dreams as we take on the dreams and desires of another.

Too often we follow in the footsteps of a family business or career.  Dad was a minister so I must be one as well.  Mom was a teacher so I must be one.  My “big dreams” are left dwindling in the night or set aside for the dreams of another.  This just doesn’t happen to the young—it can happen to the mature person as well.  I’m sure you’ve had a family member or friend who wanted to change careers later in life and everyone accused him or her of having a “mid-life crisis.”

A mid-life vision is more like it!  Hakuin was “never satisfied with small attainments.” He was never afraid to travel far and wide to find that next great mentor and teacher.  Stevens goes on to write:  “With Hakuin’s maturity, the latter half of his career as a Zen master was the “fruit”—self-less devotion to the care and nourishment of others (page 72).”[2]

Hakuin learned this idea from his teacher Shoju and shared this as well with his students: “If your eye is true and your mind unobstructed, there is nothing you cannot overcome, including a sword attack (page 67).”

I am not suggesting that we should take up arms, but we might want to release the fears that are holding us back from living the life we have dreamt of! I will leave you with a poem written by one of Hakuin’s teachers Shoju.

Die while alive,
Be completely dead!
Then do
What you will
And all will be well.

[1]

Stevens (1999) Zen Masters A Maverick, a Master of Masters, and a Wandering Poet Ikkyu, Hakuin, Ryokan Kodansha International: New York

[2] Ibid.

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