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Archive for May, 2018

Sitting Zazen facing wallThere are so many kinds of meditation from the simple Zen method of clearing your mind and counting your breath 1 on the in breath and 2 on the out breath.  Then there is the wonderful description by Frances W. Foulks in her iconic book Effectual Prayer where she writes: “To meditate on a subject is to give it attentive, earnest thought with the idea of having all its meaning revealed; that is, all the meaning that one is capable of receiving at the time (page 65).”[1]

These are different types of meditations, yet both are equally valuable in our lives.  Sometimes we simply want to go where “no” thoughts live.  Where the infinite universe and I are one.  Where no sound, or thought, or fear, or feeling exits.  Then we sit with the Buddha and become one with the breath and emptiness.

And sometimes we would like to sit as Frances describes in her chapter on meditation.

…each moment we give to meditation on the higher truths reveals to us fresh glories.  At any moment, in the night watches or in the midst of the duties of the day, in any place, on a busy street corner, at home or in the office, alone in the open field or deep in the woods, one can drop all outer things, relaxing from crowded thoughts and activities, and sink down, if for only a moment, into a holy meditation that will bring him forth filled with peace and strength, refreshed in mind and body (page 65).”[2]

She describes a “holy meditation” as something outside the ordinary and the mundane.  A place where perfect silence and love exists. Where no thoughts and all thoughts exist simultaneously.  The place outside of fear, anger, judgment, and anonymous.

Where Jianzhi Sengcan in his writing, Engraving Trust in the Heart, reveals

            One is inseparable from all.
All is inseparable from one.
If you realize this,
You go beyond thinking (page 72).[3]

This is the gift of meditation given freely to all who enter its silence, who chant the words of the teachers, and the words of our heart.  It is the giver of life and love, peace and tranquility at any time and in any place.  Regardless of the faith from which it comes we can blend our truths and our prayers and our chants and create what is right and perfect for us in the moment.  The importance is to begin a practice of prayer and meditation that works for you in that moment.  And in the next moment a different chant or prayer or breath will appear in the right and perfect time, at the right and perfect place, with the right and perfect tenor.

The thing is we have to be open and receptive to receive it and embody it and be one with it! Or expect nothing and be one with that. Are you?

[1] Foulkes F.W. (1945) Effectual Prayer. Unity School of Christianity: Lee’s Summit MO

[2] Ibid.

[3] Tanahashi, K. (2015) Zen Chants Thirty-Five Essential Texts with Commentary. Shambhala: Boston and London

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I saw a wonderful book on my bookshelf by Kazuaki Tanahashi eSensei Kaz Tanahashintitled Zen Chants, Thirty-Five Essential Texts with Commentary.  It made me think of all the affirmations, vows, and chants that I use on a regular basis and how powerful and fulfilling my life has become by using them.  Thus, the theme of the new blog series and workbook!

Each chapter will provide you with all you need to know about affirmations, vows, and chants and how– when used consistently and persistently– they can change your life for the better.  We will work with some created by others and learn how to create our own.

Napoleon Hill in his book Think and Grow Rich wrote: Truly, “thoughts are things,” and powerful things at that…(page 19).[1] Thoughts and things have weight and measure.  That’s crazy you say!  Yet true it is.  Much research has been done on the mind and the affect that our thoughts have on our body.

One of the initial simple studies done was to place some college students (all men at the time) on a seesaw.  The participant balanced himself on it, so his body was flat and stable.  Then they asked him to think of a very difficult math problem and try to work it out in his mind.  Oddly enough the seesaw began to move lower and lower on the end where his head was. Next, they asked him to see himself running in a race with a friend and guess what?  The seesaw began to move lower and lower at the end by his feet!

Thus, thoughts have weight and measure! So, when you affirm that you can not do something for sure you can’t! But with time, effort, and persistence and these techniques you will be able to do most anything! I’m not saying you can jump over a mountain or a hill in one leap like Superman and Superwoman, but you can hike to the top that’s for sure.

And so, people have written chants, poems, prayers, affirmations, and songs to help lift us up, to help us think positive, and to help us create a more fulfilling life.

Here are some words of wisdom to start off on our adventure from Yongjia Xuanjiao’s Song of Realizing the Way (page 78).

The mind mirror is clear without hindrance

Broadly reflecting the infinite world. [2]

Thus, with your mind you can encounter the infinite world and create a reality filled with all the good you desire for yourself and others!  As Captain Jean-Luc Picard said in Star Trek: Make it so!

[1] Hill, N. (1960) Think and Grow Rich. Fawcett World Library: Greenwich, Conn

[2] Tanahashi, K. (2015) Zen Chants Thirty-Five Essential Texts with Commentary. Shambhala: Boston and London

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Another mass shooting at a school…I feel compelled to repost this blog that I wrote some time ago after a school shooting.

unlockthedoortolearning

Today on Twitter I saw a post forwarded to my account from John Fugelsang from someone named JohhnyBoy that said “I wish gun related deaths were just as scary to Americans as ebola.”  During our Zen Buddhist service and sitting this morning we prayed for the families and friends of the students killed during school yesterday in Marysville, WA .  The combination of this incident and the post from JohnnyBoy brought back to mind the short piece that one of our teachers had given me to put into our Zen Bulletin and on our website he titled it  “Excitement.”  Wilbur Mushin May Sensei wrote:

We cannot live without excitement.  However, when excitement becomes the sole purpose in life that’s out of balance, that does not work.  It seems, we strive to be on a constant high all the time.  Having fun almost becomes an addiction.  But the craving for the…

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adult ancient art asia

In our last section we’ll look at Bhikkhu Nyanasobhano’s thoughts on how we can grow into the person that we desire to be—someone who can live the beautiful principles of Buddhism on a minute by minute basis.  He gives us a template to follow with the 5 Hindrances.  He writes:

These categories and formulations are worth studying in the texts, as they not only describe from various standpoints the journey to liberation but impress on the student’s mind the dynamic and cumulative nature of the Dhamma [Dharma] so that there can be no mistaking both the existence of higher and higher levels of attainment and the advantages of reaching them.  A sound theoretical knowledge will also help steer one away from dead ends in meditation and unjustified self-criticism or self-congratulation (page 137).[1]

Thus the 5 Hindrances:

  1. Desire, clinging, craving
  2. Aversion, anger, hatred
  3. Sleepiness, laziness
  4. Restlessness
  5. Doubt

Investigating a Hindrance: The RAIN Formula

R: Recognize it
A: Accept it
I: Investigate it, what’s it like?
N: Non-identification

(This is just a passing problem that comes and goes, not who we are.) [2]

I still encounter these 5 Hindrances on a regular basis.  Some days I encounter a whole bunch of them and other times I’m only challenged by one or two. Today may be my lucky day and I might not encounter any. WoooHooo!

Because I practice the teachings of Buddhism on a daily basis I am able to recognize these 5 Hindrances more quickly. This allows me to do something right away to fix the problem that I have created.  Plus, I am less apt to demean myself or others in the process.

Bhikkhu Nyanasobhano goes on to write: To build a good house we must have proper tools.  To make a safe journey we need a map (page 138).[3]  I encourage you to take these 5 Hindrances and work on them each day to use them as your map. Before you know it, you’ll have the most wonderful home filled with peace, love, and compassion for self and others regardless of the circumstance or situation!

Let it RAIN on you each day and watch what beautiful things begin to grow in your life!

Good luck with that!  Let me know how it grows!

[1] Ibid.

[2] https://www.reddit.com/r/Buddhism/comments/6ft69t/the_5_hindrances_to_meditation/

[3] Nyanasobhano, B. (1998) Landscapes of wonder Discovering Buddhist Dhamma in the world around us. Somerville Massachusetts: Wisdom Publications

[4]  Photo by Mikes Photos on Pexels.com

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8 fold path Bodhi TVBhikkhu Nyanasobhano writes, “Buddhism teaches that human beings are imperfect yet may become perfect by their own exertions, as long as those exertions are directed along the Noble Eightfold Path (page 89).”[1] I’ve shared this information with you in other blogs and other workbooks but it is always worth repeating especially in the times in which we are living!

So, what does it mean to be “right” and “honerable” anyway?

When you and I are in a conversation and we take different sides of a discussion or work process or relationship we will both believe that what we said, did, or expected was right, honest, and true.  And yet you may have experienced the same thing and saw it in a completely different light.  So where does honor come in this situation?

Bhikkhu goes on to write, “While everybody professes belief in ethical behavior, such belief likely amounts to very little unless backed by practical judgment, reverence for moral precepts, and a sense of honor (page 90).”[2]  Unfortunately, we don’t hear much about “a sense of honor” these days.  Do we even know what that means?  A man or woman who demonstrates honor is fair, truthful, trustworthy, and embodies integrity in their words and deeds. You can depend upon them to be there when you need them, to standup for you when you are not around, and always do the “right” thing at the right time.  Whatever that “right thing” may be at the time will be specific to the event in the moment in which it occurs.

It is often difficult to live a life of honor especially in our jobs and our relationships. However, as a Buddhist it is our obligation to do so no matter how “hard” it may be.  To uphold the Eightfold Path can be a challenge for sure; however, it is imperative to do so as it upholds our teachings and our way of life.  Bhikkhu goes on to write, “To live a life of honor is to examine and to act on the basis of timeless Dhamma [Dharma], which is universally beneficial and altogether superior to the rationalizations of the day (page 93).”[3] Day in and day out we rationalize our words and actions.  We find excuses for them by the jar full.  We try as hard as we can to “make them right.”   I don’t know about you but I always have to be “right.” Even when I’m not right!  But doing so takes me away from a life of honor.

In closing Bhikkhu writes, “The Buddha teaches us that our own deeds will be our inheritance and our refuge. They should therefore be such that we can live on and die on with a tranquil mind. By raising up a sense of honor we begin to lift our ideals and the trend of our habitual conduct from the level of perishing material to the higher, finer plane where the holy ones have stood—and where we too might someday stand (page 101).”[4]

Meet me there—won’t you?!

 

[1] Picture taken from Bodhi Television http://bodhitv.tv/article/171029a/

[2]Nyanasobhano, B. (1998) Landscapes of wonder Discovering Buddhist Dhamma in the world around us. Somerville Massachusetts: Wisdom Publications

[3] Ibid.

[4] Ibid.

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